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Posts Tagged ‘jack Russell tattoo

In the dog world, aggression is a very dirty word. This is something that many dog owners, even professional breeders not only come into contact with, but conflict on. In a nutshell most forms of aggression are one of the most natural traits and instincts that have been bred into your dog, and they will occur, its nature. However, this same instinct has been used as an excuse to surrender, abandon even euthanize, thousands of dogs if not more. Dogs have existed for thousands of years with their only tools of communication between each other to be biting and growling. Many inexperienced individuals often see this as aggression in the wrong situation. Dogs communicate to each other through body language. This often consists of growling as well as physical contact which includes mouthing and use of teeth. Bringing a dog into your home with the expectations of efficient training and the complete elimination of all forms of aggressive communication is almost as absurd as asking a person to become deaf and blind at will.

Over the centuries dog owners have bred into dogs the instincts of loyalty, companionship, and the enjoyment of being petted, touched, or even snuggling with humans. This is not a natural condition for any species of animal, but has been collectively imprinted upon the dog psyche and passed along from their ancestors. Of course being the descendant of a sociable dog doesn’t mean that a dog will be equally sociable. Any dog must have firm training, supervision and discipline in order to be compatible with any human family.

Kellie Rainwater loves her Jack Russell Terrier, Trixie, so much that she co-authored the book, “The Jack Russell Terrier: Canine Companion or Demon Dog.” You can find this book and other Jack Russell toys, jewelry, and merchandise that is branded with the face of this tenacious canine at http://www.dkrainwater.com

Many dog lovers have gravitated towards the breed for its friendly, curious personality and diminutive size. Although a popular pet and excellent companion, it pays to do your research the Jack Russell and know what want and what to expect from them. There is a misconception among the general public thanks to movies and TV that the Jack Russell is a quiet helper and lap dog that will relax with you after a long day. The traits and characteristics are something that has been purposely created and highly desirable to the generations of breeders who have cared for the Jack Russell. Above all they prize this dog for being fearless, intelligent and alert. A dog that is truly ready to face the world head-on without a second thought. If you use a Jack Russell as a lap dog you will end up with a very unhappy dog that will likely destroy your house.

The dog portrayed in films is an example of a highly trained professional working dog that has been trained to behave a certain way on camera. He is an actor. This depiction does not in any way represent the behavior of the real life Jack Russell in a family setting. Just because the dog is small does not make it a lap dog. He may enjoy lying on your lap from time to time, when the mood strikes him, but that will only be a very small percentage of the time. At any second something could gain the the attention of your Jack and it will bound out of your lap and be on its way. A shadow going across the wall or the movement of a curtain can have your Jack flying through the air on the way to its next adventure.

Kellie Rainwater loves her Jack Russell Terrier, Trixie, so much that she co-authored the book, “The Jack Russell Terrier: Canine Companion or Demon Dog.” You can find this book and other Jack Russell toys, jewelry, and merchandise that is branded with the face of this tenacious canine at http://www.dkrainwater.com

Trying to stop barking from extreme territorialism can be quite more challenging than that little story. Especially when you consider that barking is a quite natural reaction for the Jack Russell because of its breeding history. In the past the Jack Russell was supposed to view all of its surroundings as its territory and bark as an alarm when other people or animals were in it. The best way to practice good ownership and good neighbor relations is to prevent any unnecessary barking behavior before it starts. The way to do this is to start from an early age, as soon as you bring your puppy home. The dog is smart and will learn from repetition. The key to success is consistency. Scold negative behavior and reward good behavior or responding to the command when you say “no” or “stop”.

The most important detail in order to successfully train your Jack is to evaluate what is acceptable consistency. Do it every time and do it immediately. Scold bad behavior, reward good, do it every time, and your Jack will be much more manageable as an adult. During the early training period it is best that the Jack Russell pup be kept indoors while the owner is away instead of in a fenced yard; unless another care provider will be present in order to administer the same strict correction as the owner in their absence. Remember, it’s very much discouraged to try and achieve success in training by physically harming the dog or breaking its spirit. The Jack Russell’s behavior is rooted in its ancestry and breeding, using violence to correct it will often create more personality problems in this strong willed breed. A well trained Jack Russell will enjoy pleasing its master and spending time with them. A happy Jack will exhibit more loyalty and affection than the owner can handle. Remember to be understanding, no Jack, even the best trained will respond perfectly to every command 100% of the time.

Kellie Rainwater loves her Jack Russell Terrier, Trixie, so much that she co-authored the book, “The Jack Russell Terrier: Canine Companion or Demon Dog.” You can find this book and other Jack Russell toys, jewelry, and merchandise that is branded with the face of this tenacious canine at http://www.dkrainwater.com

Jacks are highly intelligent and not likely to give themselves up for abuse. Jack’s often know when they’ve done wrong and will expect scolding, even exhibiting submission behavior before you know what they’ve done. Using physical punishment will mean that you can kiss any sense of remorse in your Jack Russell goodbye. They’ll be gone before you can get anywhere near them. They’re fast too. They were bred to chase fox, which is a very swift animal. Stop chasing them; you’re not going to catch them. The best way to train a Jack is to vocally scold them for bad behavior, and possibly include a short time out in a restricted area. Many people advise against using the crate as a time-out zone because it may make the dog unwilling to go into the crate, which you want him to feel safe and comfortable in, not punished.

The best results come from reinforcing good behavior with a combination of treats and clicker training. Jack Russell’s do have a good memory and will remember what they like and don’t like. You usually can’t fool them with the same trick more than twice, and it doesn’t take long for them to figure out how to get what they want and avoid what they don’t. One famous story tells of a man whose Jack Russell would wake up promptly at 1:30 am and begin to bark incessantly for no apparent reason. The man finally came up with a plan. He devised a system of ropes and pulleys tied to a bucket placed over the dog’s kennel that filled from a garden hose. The end of the rope was tied to the man’s nightstand next to his bed. That night when the dog began barking, the man pulled the rope, causing the bucket to tip and douse the dog with water. The man did this every time the dog would begin barking unnecessarily. After two nights of this the dog quit barking in the middle of the night and never did it again. While this story may have been embellished over time, and seem a little extreme for most owners, it does illustrate the characteristics of the Jack Russell to “learn from its mistakes”.

Kellie Rainwater loves her Jack Russell Terrier, Trixie, so much that she co-authored the book, “The Jack Russell Terrier: Canine Companion or Demon Dog.” You can find this book and other Jack Russell toys, jewelry, and merchandise that is branded with the face of this tenacious canine at http://www.dkrainwater.com