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When bringing animals together it’s important not to leave them unattended for any length of time, especially if there are more than two Jacks. Jacks have a pack hunting mentality, a natural instinct from hundreds of years of breeding. They will exhibit those traits. It’s very unwise to leave two or more jacks alone with a cat or another pet. A Jack that has previously been non-aggressive towards cats and other animals may take part in the killing of such an animal when in the pack environment. There have even been cases where some Jacks have ganged up on a weaker one in the pack and injured or even killed it. A close eye on the dynamic of any pet gathering involving the Jack Russell is advisable. Again, it is possible that this can happen no matter how cute or well trained your dog is. It’s in their nature, the behavior is instinctual and no amount of training will overpower the animal’s instincts entirely.

First time owners will often find they are overwhelmed and wonder why the dog’s needs are so demanding. It’s best to know what you are getting into before hand and make sure that your home has the time and environment to meet those needs before bringing a Jack Russell home. Although the Jack Russell owner always has to be alert of the potential dangers, many owners will eventually come to think of their Jack as more of a person than a dog. The unique and intelligent personalities exhibited find many owners considering their Jacks to be like a child. Owners will even find themselves worried about their Jack’s mood and happiness. This is because the Jack is prone to mood swings.

Kellie Rainwater loves her Jack Russell Terrier, Trixie, so much that she co-authored the book, “The Jack Russell Terrier: Canine Companion or Demon Dog.” You can find this book and other Jack Russell toys, jewelry, and merchandise that is branded with the face of this tenacious canine at http://www.dkrainwater.com

It’s always advisable to keep your Jack Russell on a leash when out in the public or in wilderness areas you are unfamiliar with. If the dog is loose and catches an interesting scent he will be gone. Jack Russell’s seem to suffer from an indefinable, genetic form of deafness, known to people as selective hearing. They appear to hear very well any other time, but when they’ve caught an interesting scent all your cries of “stop!” and “come back here!” seem to go unheard. It’s wise to keep your Jack on a leash in public parks. Jack Russell’s don’t only see foxes, cats, raccoons and other furry animals as an enemy. Jack Russell’s have also been known to aggressively attack, defend against, and hunt any digging or crawling animal, even snakes.

As previously stated, Jack Russell’s do not possess the fears that humans do. A Jack Russell will respond to an aggressive snake in the same way as an aggressive dog, and even chase them to their holes and dig if need be to catch them. Many Jack Russell’s have met an untimely end from a poisonous snake. It’s recommended to never leave your dog unattended in a place where it may encounter such an animal. If possible it’s best to avoid any type of snake altogether. Although a Jack Russell can and will easily kill snakes, poisonous or not; non-poisonous snakes can still present a danger. Some species of non-poisonous snakes will have long, hooked fangs and will bite your dog in self defense. If these bites become infected they are not treatable on the surface because the infection is actually nowhere near the puncture wound. These types of infected wounds can result in fatal blood poisoning or painful and expensive surgery. It is best to simply avoid snakes altogether.

Kellie Rainwater loves her Jack Russell Terrier, Trixie, so much that she co-authored the book, “The Jack Russell Terrier: Canine Companion or Demon Dog.” You can find this book and other Jack Russell toys, jewelry, and merchandise that is branded with the face of this tenacious canine at http://www.dkrainwater.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/

The Jack Russell is also unwaveringly loyal. The mighty little wonder will go to any lengths to protect its home and family. A jack will not hesitate to protect owners and children in its family. Some Jacks have even been known to protect other pets in the family from harm. If a Jack perceives a member of the family to be in danger they will even often protect them by placing their own body between whomever they are protecting and the perceived danger. This loyalty makes the Jack Russell one of the bravest little dog breeds in the world, and many a Jack has been injured or even killed while protecting loved ones from harm.

Thanks to its energy level this mighty little bundle of fur requires a huge investment of time and attention. In order to maintain any sanity in their home life, owners have to focus on activity, exercise, training and discipline. Owners of Jack Russell’s also have to exhibit a certain amount of acceptance of their Jack Russell and the history behind the breed that makes him who he is. The owner has to understand the hunting nature that has been bred into the dog and find ways to work with it. Your Jack Russell is who he is, and you will not change him.

In the very early years a Jack Russell must have consistent training and vigorous exercise. Without that ground work in place a Jack Russell can become aggressive, unmanageable, disobey commands, bark excessively, chase strangers, and even exhibit aggression towards guests in your home. A well trained Jack is more than happy to comply with the rules of the home and obey commands…unless they’ve caught onto the scent of another animal.

Kellie Rainwater loves her Jack Russell Terrier, Trixie, so much that she co-authored the book, “The Jack Russell Terrier: Canine Companion or Demon Dog.” You can find this book and other Jack Russell toys, jewelry, and merchandise that is branded with the face of this tenacious canine at http://www.dkrainwater.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles

Most Jack Russells have a Napoleon complex. As often as he is top dog he can also get into situations where a larger dog will respond with extreme aggression, putting your Jack in real danger. It pays to closely supervise your Jack Russell when in the presence of other dogs. These Napoleon/Jack’s often think they are as big as a full grown German Shepherd or Mastiff. It’s likely a very good thing that they are not, a Jack Russell of that size would likely terrorize an entire neighborhood.

Egotistical and full of life seems to be one accurate description of the Jack Russell. A Napoleonic Jack will often exhibit territorial issues. They will often mark every inch of their property daily and take the protection of that territory very seriously. When another dog, no matter the size, approaches this Jack’s territory he will immediately respond with a growl. When defending territory the Napoleonic Jack will also exhibit bristled hair along his back that will stand up straight and resemble a Mohawk; the tail will point straight up in the air; his head will lower, and his gaze will fix in a menacing glare at the intruder. The Jack will them begin marching forward, eyeing up the violator for a good spot to bite.

Very large breeds will often be shocked by this response and double take as if bewildered. The Jack often uses this state of surprise to further puff up and intimidate the intruder, often scaring off much larger dogs that would normally be more dominant. Some large breeds will be so surprised they will become submissive or flee for their lives in uncertainty. This is just another trademark of your fearless Jack Russell. If your yard is unfenced it is recommended to never leave your Jack out untied or unsupervised. Some dogs won’t care how tough your Jack is.

Whether he is of the Napoleonic persuasion or not, your fearless Jack trying to dominate a large aggressive dog may land your little dynamo in some very serious, even fatal danger. Whether you are thinking about or already own a Jack it is wise to inform yourself and carefully consider all of the information available to you. As one expert has put it, just remember…he is Napoleon and YOU are Admiral Nelson. After taking all this Jack Russell Terrier information under consideration, and you know this is just the dog for you, there may be a little Napoleon waiting to make you a very, very proud owner.

Kellie Rainwater loves her Jack Russell Terrier, Trixie, so much that she co-authored the book, “The Jack Russell Terrier: Canine Companion or Demon Dog.” You can find this book and other Jack Russell toys, jewelry, and merchandise that is branded with the face of this tenacious canine at http://www.dkrainwater.com

A young Jack Russell may be leery of small children and babies the first time that they encounter them, but will quickly adapt. Once a Jack Russell has become accustomed to the presence of little people he will often enjoy their company and the enthusiasm that children usually show in playing games of fetch and other activities that Jacks love. It’s important to note that a Jack Russell will not tolerate being manhandled or abused by anyone, small children or adults. The Jack is unique in this way as it has one of the most well defined senses of personal boundaries of any dog breed, which is often unexpected because of its size. A Jack will quickly and aggressively defend itself against any form of abuse, even unintentional. Very small children who are prone to pinching, grabbing or squeezing the dog should be kept at a safe distance. Children should be taught from an early age how to properly treat the dog and what type of interaction is inappropriate.

Jack Russell’s are very friendly and outgoing to both humans and other dogs, often ready to play with other canine breeds upon first meeting. It is very common though for a Jack Russell to exhibit aggression and dominance toward other dogs of the same sex. The male Jack is happy to play with other dogs, as long as they know he is the alpha male. A very common mental quirk among Jack Russell’s is what’s known as the Napoleon Complex. The Napoleon Complex can best be described as the inability to recognize the reality of a situation. The key trait of this complex is that the dog will behave as if it is much bigger than it is, and refuse to accept any type of dominant behavior from another breed, even if much, much larger. Jack’s who exhibit this trait are essentially fearless and will try to press its own dominance onto another animal, no matter its size. It’s as if the jack doesn’t realize how small it is at all. Their alpha attitude quite surprisingly can work to their advantage, and the Jack has been known to easily scare of dogs and other animals that are much larger than it.

Kellie Rainwater loves her Jack Russell Terrier, Trixie, so much that she co-authored the book, “The Jack Russell Terrier: Canine Companion or Demon Dog.” You can find this book and other Jack Russell toys, jewelry, and merchandise that is branded with the face of this tenacious canine at http://www.dkrainwater.com

Jack Russell’s are best suited to a home with an active family who enjoy the outdoors. Jack Russell’s will do best in a rural or country setting where there is wilderness for them to run, explore and play in. Keeping your Jack Russell as a welcome part of the family means firm, consistent training and patience. Another key to enjoying your Jack is regular lengthy exercise and fun games to occupy them. Failure to keep your Jack Russell active will often result in a bored dog that will show a change in temperament and quickly find himself in trouble. Your wardrobe, shoes, furniture and other belongings will suffer.

Jack Russell’s are very playful and have very flamboyant personalities. Allowing them a chance to exercise these traits will help keep your Jack happy and healthy.

Jack Russell’s that are not shown the proper care, training and exercise can quickly become an unmanageable member of the family. Jack’s that are not properly attended to will often exhibit excessive and unwarranted barking, an unstoppable urge to escape from your home or property, unwanted digging and damage outside and inside the home as well as damage to personal belongings within the home that are within reach.

Though different Jack Russells do have different personalities, as a puppy you never know what you will get. If you are not an active family or if you plan to give a Jack to a senior or older couple, make sure they understand the care that is needed, and also the energy level.

Kellie Rainwater loves her Jack Russell Terrier, Trixie, so much that she co-authored the book, “The Jack Russell Terrier: Canine Companion or Demon Dog.” You can find this book and other Jack Russell toys, jewelry, and merchandise that is branded with the face of this tenacious canine at http://www.dkrainwater.com

A reason that vocalism makes the Jack valuable is that they will often follow prey into their burrows and tunnel after them underground. If the dog is already underground the only way to know the location of the dog is to follow the sound of its bark coming from beneath the soil. Jacks sometimes find themselves stuck in these tunnels, which is why every good hunter brings a shovel with him in order to dig the Jack out if the need arises.

The bark can often let the hunter know where to dig in order to get close, and where not to dig, so the dog isn’t injured by the shovel. This is why the Jack Russell was bred to be very vocal, and why even non-hunting Jack Russell’s today exhibit this trait. The Jack Russell Terrier has also been bred to be very intelligent. The nature of the work that Jack Russell’s are meant for is unpredictable at best.

There is rarely a consistent hunting experience unless a hunter chooses to hunt the same spot every time of a regular basis. This is rare. Even if the same location is used consistently, there are often obstacles that haven’t been encountered on previous hunts. The most valuable Jack Russell’s are the ones who can meet challenges and do complex problem solving on the spot in order to gain the advantage. Much of the prey hunted by the Jack Russell, such as the fox and the raccoon are equally as intelligent and it takes a clever dog in order outsmart the sly and elusive game it is hunting.

Kellie Rainwater loves her Jack Russell Terrier, Trixie, so much that she co-authored the book, “The Jack Russell Terrier: Canine Companion or Demon Dog.” You can find this book and other Jack Russell toys, jewelry, and merchandise that is branded with the face of this tenacious canine at http://dkrainwater.com