Dkrainwater’s Weblog

Buying Fireplace Bellows For Holiday Gifts

Posted on: November 26, 2008

The use of fireplace bellows has been around for a long time.  A fireplace bellows works by drawing air through a whole in the bottom and forcing it through a nozzle by pressing down on either side and having leather pieces push air out.  People use fireplace bellows to get a fire going instead of using their mouth to blow the embers to start the fire.  Small bellows can work but large bellows are usually used to help get a fire going because they have a more volume of air.  Besides starting fires fireplace bellows can have more uses than just starting fires. You can buy a fireplace bellows that are aesthetically pleasing to your household decor and at the same time can be useful when starting a fire on a cold day.  

Fireplace bellows can even be personalized to accent a coat of arms for a family or an initial for a individual person.  Most fireplace bellows are made of wood and are decorated with either brass or metal ornaments.  They can come with the most simple of designs and still accent your furnishing and decorations, but if you are a more elaborate person, fireplace bellows can be adorned with brass, hand-painted, or even carved wood.  Fireplace bellows are great warming presents for people who enjoy a nice fire or the idea of having fireplace accessories around the house. You can find fireplace bellows online in many venues that can offer you new fireplace bellows or ones that have been used or are considered antiques.

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  • Jhon: I bookmarked your blog, thanks for sharing this very interesting post
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