Dkrainwater’s Weblog

USMC Emblem: Eagle, Globe, and Anchor

Posted on: October 24, 2008

 

What do the eagle, globe, and the anchor stand for? It is the official emblem of the United States Marines. The USMC emblem has its roots in the American colonies. The Continental Congress formed the Continental Marines on November 10, 1775 and disbanded them in 1783. They were the sea faring force of the military during the American Revolutionary War that protected the officers and Captain of the ships; they were the security forces on the naval ships. In the heat of the naval battles the Continental Marines served as sharpshooters on the top of the mast and they aimed specifically for the gunners, helmsmen, and officers of the enemy.

 

The design we have today of the USMC emblem is rooted in the graphics and ornaments of the Continental Marines and the British Royal Marines. The current USMC emblem was adopted in 1955; the only change of the design from 1868 was the difference in the eagle. The design of 1776 featured a fouled anchor, which means the anchor has one or several wraps of the chain around it. Changes in the design were proscribed in1798, 1821, 1824, and 1834. The buttons of dress and service uniforms of today’s marines bear the insignia change of 1834. That was a brass eagle to be worn on a Marines hat.

 

A board of 1868 recommended the globe, fouled anchor, and the spread eagle. Semper Fidelis is the Latin motto meaning Always Faithful that is inscribed on the ribbon of the USMC emblem.

 

For more information on these products and other Marine Corps clothing, Marine Corps books, Marine Corps DVDs, Marine Corps weapons, and other Marine Corps products, please visit http://www.papajoemarine.com, the one stop marine product website.

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  • Ventless Fireplaces: A good safey way to wipe down the brass is to use windex, it's safe for the material and removes soot from back drafting with no problem.
  • Jhon: I bookmarked your blog, thanks for sharing this very interesting post
  • Ron Burling: I joined the Navy in 1966 and served until 1978. Every pair of the blue wool trousers I was issued had 13 buttons. I was in the Seabees, and we onl
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